Wrinkle Free

Wrinkle Free

These moisturiser-impregnated fabric face masks — known as a ‘cheat sheet’ because it lets you cheat your way to a brighter, clearer complexion in minutes — have suddenly become the thing to be seen wearing. Barely a week goes by without a celebrity sharing a picture of themselves on their social media pages wearing one of these white sheets draped over their face, eyes peering out from a ghostly visage.

Yes, a mask may turn you into a Hannibal Lecter lookalike, but it makes you look younger. From Adele and Paris Hilton to Lady Gaga and Alexa Chung, they’re all at it.

‘I tell you what I want, what I really, really want!’: For this ex-Spice Girl (left), it’s a face mask.  (right) Shy, retiring and covered up? How very novel for this American hotel heiress

Quite why these A-listers feel compelled to showcase every aspect of their beauty regimens to the world remains a mystery, but according to London-based facialist Cherry Woods, cheat sheets are an invaluable accompaniment to the busy party season — for stars and the rest of us alike.

‘They offer a practical and easy skin treatment that doesn’t rely on faffing around with pots of cream,’ she says. ‘They won’t mess up your hair when you apply them or irritate and dry your skin when you try and take them off, as some conventional clay masks can.’

 


Not only did the songstress snag five trophies at this year’s Billboard Music Awards (for Top Artist, Top Female Artist, Top Billboard 200 Album, Top Billboard 200 Artist, and Top Selling Song), the British powerhouse also debuted her slimmer, winning figure. 

As reported by the Daily Mail, the 28-year-old (who just signed a record-breaking deal with Sony) has been shedding pounds by working with fitness trainer Pete Geracimo and by following Geracimo’s eating plan of choice, the Sirtfood diet.

Based on research from two nutritional medicine experts from the United Kingdom, its premise is to consume sirtfoods in order turn off the appetite and turn on “the skinny gene.”

“This diet is one based on eating foods that activate sirtuins, proteins that protect the cells in our bodies from cell death and inflammation,” Isabel K. Smith, MS, RD, a New York City based celebrity dietitian fitness expert, tells Yahoo Beauty. “And it’s been said [that this process] is involved in metabolism and healthy aging.”

And yes, Smith says there is such a thing as the newly-named skinny gene. Clinically known as SIRT1, it’s understood to assist in weight loss by inhibiting fat storage while boosting metabolism since it serves as a means of survival in order to help humans — even mammals — during times of “starvation.” In fact, a study published in a 2015 edition of the journal Frontiers in Endocrinology, discovered that restoring SIRT1 function can prevent age-related weight gain in mice.

 


Imagine if you had a switch that could balance your metabolism and do a deep cleanse without the use of expensive fan dangled detox kits? Your body is designed to do so by using a genius mechanism known as autophagy. Celebrities have discovered that intermittent fasting, or autophagy,  is one of the best techniques used to turn on this anti aging reboot switch.

Autophagy may sound like a mouthful but it is in fact the ultimate recycling system. It preserves the health of tissue by replacing out-dated and damaged parts of your cell with fresh ones.

“Your cells create membranes that hunt out scraps of dead, diseased, or worn-out cells; gobble them up; strip ’em for parts; and use the resulting molecules for energy or to make new cell parts,” explains Dr. Colin Champ, a board-certified oncologist and assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. In the process autophagy also eats up any pathogenic organisms such as bad bacteria’s.

The consumption of these dangerous bits creates fuel for your cell, as well as reusing the healthy parts. Cells can also digest long-lived proteins to release amino acids providing you with more fuel. This process is a powerful promoter of metabolic homeostasis (balance). In a nutshell autophagy is a major key in slowing the aging process.

Experts are finding evidence that autophagy plays a role in controlling inflammation and immune response. It can help prevent cancerous growths and metabolic dysfunction such as obesity and diabetes. In a set of studies conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey, Eileen White and her colleagues found that autophagy protects against DNA damage. When they inhibited autophagy, they observed more chromosomal abnormalities, which are typically associated with tumorigenesis.

 

Two rules are universal among experts:Use a retinoid nightly (the vitamin A derivatives stimulate collagen, fight wrinkles, and halt acne), and wear sunscreen daily. “The only time you don’t need sunscreen is when you need a flashlight to see,” insists Beverly Hills dermatologist Harold Lancer.

Sunblock every morning is critical, and dermatologist Elizabeth Hale says some of the best are in the drugstore aisles. “Look for one with zinc oxide for broad-spectrum sun protection and an SPF of at least 30.”

According to dermatologist Dr. Patricia Wexler, as soon as you start noticing dark spots from sun damage, which tend to show up in your 20s, it’s time for a retinol with vitamin C. “The combination of vitamin A and C will tackle wrinkles and lines, lackluster skin, enlarged pores and pigmentation very effectively,” says Wexler, who adds that you don’t have to wait for wrinkles to develop to start a retinol regimen.

To rehydrate the skin and replenish those spaces between the cells, you need a combination of lipids, says Hale. Nourishing your skin via dietary sources such as salmon and other fatty fish is important, but you really need products with moisturizing ingredients like ceramides, shea butter, and fatty-acid-rich botanical oils, plus potent humectants like hyaluronic acid, which can hold 1,000 times its weight in water. 

“[In your 50s] Follow your instinct to upgrade to richer products,” says New York dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, “and consider layering multiple hydrators,” from lightest to heaviest.